students https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/ en Building Community https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/building-community <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Building Community</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/28/2020 - 11:49</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="views-element-container block block-views block-views-block--important-notice-notice-view-block" data-block-plugin-id="views_block:important_notice-notice_view_block"> <div><div class="view view-important-notice view-id-important_notice view-display-id-notice_view_block js-view-dom-id-346cc8c4a99064c6642c265ac15269205d8ca36b8d795337bab6733b1717c60e"> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><a href="https://www.scps.virginia.edu/faculty/stories/charlotte-matthews/" target="_blank">Charlotte Matthews</a> is an Associate Professor in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. She has many years of experience teaching online in the School's Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program and discovered what works and doesn't work for her during that time. Charlotte shares a few ways that you can try to build community in your synchronous online courses.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/B7K0gmdqj2M?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/576" hreflang="en">interactive</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/571" hreflang="en">seminar</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/566" hreflang="en">synchronous</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/466" hreflang="en">breakout rooms</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/546" hreflang="en">community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/491" hreflang="en"> whiteboard</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 28 Sep 2020 15:49:14 +0000 ks8yx 411 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Student Perspectives https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/student-perspectives <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Student Perspectives</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 08/25/2020 - 16:41</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="views-element-container block block-views block-views-block--important-notice-notice-view-block" data-block-plugin-id="views_block:important_notice-notice_view_block"> <div><div class="view view-important-notice view-id-important_notice view-display-id-notice_view_block js-view-dom-id-ccc6ece2a32d25c3b5605929f6ccf838fe698afb749bf37bbb1a2f9baad9b403"> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In the following videos, CTE undergraduate student consultants share their experiences at UVA, learning in Spring 2020, and when instructors have utilized their perspectives and expertise to improve a course. The hope is that instructors will work to build connections with students, solicit student input to make their courses better, and engage them as co-creators of their learning experiences—all of which are especially important in an online environment.</p> <center><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/programs-grants/teaching-consultation-program" target="_blank"><strong>Schedule your consultation today!</strong></a></center> <p> </p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tetCrTeoCzI" width="500"></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qr6jc_eE8D4" width="500"></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kdP1w9W5oRg" width="500"></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/txSK0cpkaI0" width="500"></iframe></p> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/561" hreflang="en">discussion</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/546" hreflang="en">community</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/551" hreflang="en">instructor</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 25 Aug 2020 20:41:06 +0000 ks8yx 401 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Syllabus Language https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/syllabus-language <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Syllabus Language</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/06/2020 - 15:18</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="views-element-container block block-views block-views-block--important-notice-notice-view-block" data-block-plugin-id="views_block:important_notice-notice_view_block"> <div><div class="view view-important-notice view-id-important_notice view-display-id-notice_view_block js-view-dom-id-e689a47c7d7bcf9e7b41fd9023b89af7c2736f2077f9c4cfc3a14d4f472f4678"> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>These sections contain guiding questions for instructors to consider as they prepare for the upcoming semester, as well as language that instructors may add to course syllabi. </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Instructors are free to copy and modify any of this language to fit their context. Click on “Sample Language” under each topic to see specific language suggestions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong><a href="#Communicating Care">Communicating Care</a> | <a href="#Instructional Mode">Instructional Mode</a> | <a href="#Flexibility and Contingency Plans">Flexibility and Contingency Plans</a> | <a href="#Communication and Office Hours">Communication and Office Hours</a> | <a href="#Class Meetings and Activities">Class Meetings and Activities</a> | <a href="#Class Recordings">Class Recordings</a> | <a href="#Physical Health and Space">Physical Health and Space</a> | <a href="#Technology and Accessibility">Technology and Accessibility</a> | <a href="#Student Support Services">Student Support Services</a></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>For specific guidance related to overall course design, please consult with the </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Center for Teaching Excellence</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>, </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://learningdesign.as.virginia.edu/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>A&amp;S Learning Design and Technology</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>, or </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/getting-help" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>your school’s instructional designers</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>. The guidance below does not and is not intended to constitute formal UVA policy. For the most up-to-date policies, please visit the </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://coronavirus.virginia.edu/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Return to Grounds website</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <hr /><h2><a id="Communicating Care" name="Communicating Care">Communicating Care</a></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>What beliefs about teaching, learning, and humanity do you bring to the course? Consider what aspects of the past year have influenced your teaching plans and philosophy, and if they warrant a standalone section in the syllabus or distribution throughout.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt> <p>Sample Language for Inclusive Teaching Philosophy</p> </dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I recognize and value the many perspectives my students bring to the classroom. Many factors—social identities, visible and invisible disabilities, family circumstances, physical location, mental health, access to the internet—all influence the experiences that every individual can have in my courses this and every semester. I am committed to building an environment to support your learning, one in which you will be supported and rewarded for going out on a limb to communicate and defend your ideas.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> <dt>Sample Language for Supporting Black Lives</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I acknowledge that racism and white supremacy are baked into both the history of UVA as an institution and the history of higher education as a whole. I believe that my pedagogical philosophies and practices can either reinforce inequities or work to eliminate them. I am committed and actively working to be a better, more careful listener; continuing to learn about the ways systemic injustices disadvantage my Black students and colleagues and other students and colleagues of color in and out of the classroom; and advocating for and implementing anti-racist educational practices. I will hold myself accountable, encourage you to help me do so, and invite you to join me in this work.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> <dt>Sample Language for Welcoming Immigrants</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Students of all immigration statuses are welcomed and valued in this classroom, including undocumented students, students from mixed-status families, and students with Temporary Protected Status. As an educator, I aim to create a learning environment that respects and affirms the diversity of students’ experiences and perspectives. If your status is impacting your success in the course, please come see me to discuss things I can do to accommodate you (assignments, attendance, etc.). I pledge to keep your status confidential unless required by judicial warrant.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h2><a id="Instructional Mode" name="Instructional Mode">Instructional Mode</a></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>1. How will your course be delivered? Refer to </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="http://records.ureg.virginia.edu/content.php?catoid=49&amp;navoid=3634#course_instruction_mode" target="_blank">the official SIS course instruction mode descriptions.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><strong>Hybrid.</strong></em> </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This is a hybrid course, which means we will meet on Grounds at times, and will otherwise work online. We’ll meet on Grounds on [DAY] during our scheduled class time, and remote students will join us via Zoom. The online components of this course will include live ‘group work time’ on [DAY] during our regularly-scheduled class time, as well as ‘asynchronous’ activities that aren’t tied to class time. Asynchronous activities might include written exchanges via UVACollab Discussions, watching pre-recorded lecture material, or responding to lecture material.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><strong>Online Synchronous.</strong></em> </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This is an online synchronous course, which means we will meet for regular class sessions online on [DAY] at [TIME], via Zoom (Collab “Online Meetings”). Your presence and active participation are required and important to creating the most effective and engaging learning experience. You are not expected to be on Grounds for exams or class meetings.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><strong>Online Asynchronous.</strong></em> </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This is an online asynchronous course, which means we will not meet for regular class sessions. Instead, you will complete activities on your own, such as written exchanges via UVACollab Discussions, watching pre-recorded lecture material, and responding to lecture material. Although we won’t meet at regularly scheduled times, assignment and exam due dates will follow a set schedule.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><strong>In-Person (with remote students).</strong></em> </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This is an in-person course, which means we will meet on Grounds for class sessions. Remote students will also be members of our class community, joining the class via Zoom. We’ll be navigating this new course structure together and adjusting as needed as we move through the semester. Class meetings will include lecture, group work, and discussion activities in which in-person students and remote students will all actively participate.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> </dl><p>2. <span><span><span><span><span><span>For instructional modes that involve both in-person and remote students, how will students understand their different options for being active members of the course community?</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>A message to remote students: You are as central to the community of this course as students who can attend class in-person. Online activities such as discussion forums, as well as our live class sessions, depend on your participation in order for this community to develop and thrive. Having a combination of remote and in-person students in class is going to be a new experience for all of us. In the first few weeks of class, we will all be adjusting to this new situation. I encourage you to reach out to me/to your TA to let us know what you are experiencing, especially if you are having trouble accessing or participating in the course. I further ask that you buddy up with a student (or group) who regularly attend live sessions, in case you lose contact with a class s</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>ession. We’ll work on creating this buddy system via a Google Doc that I’ll share on UVACollab.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h2><a id="Flexibility and Contingency Plans" name="Flexibility and Contingency Plans">Flexibility and Contingency Plans</a></h2> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How will your course and course policies adapt to sudden changes in instructional mode or other disruptions? Policies about flexibility should be closely tailored to the specific circumstances of the course.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What will your students do in the event that you, they, or a loved one becomes ill? What is the backup plan for when you, a co-instructor, or TA fall ill?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Will travel-related delays, such as quarantine requirements, prevent some of your students from attending the first several days of class?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How will your course address absences and makeup activities especially due to coronavirus exposure or illness? Are there comparable virtual activities available? Flexible assessment and grading practices? Consider the ‘hot spot’ nature of outbreaks and the possibility that entire groups of students may be missing.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>There are many unknowns this semester that could impact our course and university. We have already seen a delay of in-person classes to protect the health and safety of our community, and additional delays and disruptions may occur. Live classes will be held via Zoom (UVACollab “Online Meetings”), and it is possible that we will move to pre-recorded lecture material and more asynchronous activities that you’ll complete on your own with regular feedback from me. We will, as a community, need to be flexible and take things one step at a time. I’ll use email and post an announcement on our UVACollab site if such a shift suddenly occurs.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>In our course, flexibility includes... </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>{specific policies here, such as a limited number of free requests/tokens for deadline extensions, flexibility in the number of items contributing to an overall grade, how much advance notice is required for requesting assignment modifications, etc.}</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Flexibility also includes communication. I encourage you to have a plan for communicating with instructors in case you become ill. In the event that I become ill, I will contact a colleague and/or my department chair to communicate with you about how our course will proceed. Please pay close attention to email communications and/or UVACollab announcements throughout this semester.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h2><a id="Communication and Office Hours" name="Communication and Office Hours">Communication and Office Hours</a></h2> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What are the email and communication norms for your course? How can students best reach you, and how long should they expect it to take to hear back from you? Note that  students in different time zones may find themselves working on assignments at quite different hours than you are available.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How will you hold office hours this semester? Do you plan to hold a recurring Zoom meeting where students can pop in, or will you use the Zoom personal meeting space (which relies on a waiting room that you will then have to monitor)? Will your students need to sign up in advance? Consider including a link to a digital signup tool, such as UVACollab’s Sign Up tool.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am available for questions and discussion via email and during office hours. My office hours will be virtual and by appointment; the Zoom office hours link and signup are available on our UVACollab site’s front page. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>For questions related to completing course assignments, I encourage you to first review the course syllabus </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>{LINK}</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>, and then post questions to classmates via </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>{email, Collab Piazza, etc.}</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Questions posted to the class will often get a response more quickly than an email to me. I will try my best to reply to your email within 24 hours during the regular work week.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h2><a id="Class Meetings and Activities" name="Class Meetings and Activities">Class Meetings and Activities</a></h2> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What are the synchronous attendance expectations for your class? If a student is in a different time zone, or is simply not available during your scheduled class meeting time, to what extent is watching the recordings an acceptable alternative? If your course includes asynchronous components, what is the equivalent of “attendance”? Consider that student </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>engagement </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>with course activities and content may be a more useful indicator than </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>attendance. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How can students act responsibly and contribute positively to learning in the online setting, both in asynchronous and synchronous discussions? Develop guidelines for classroom etiquette and respect and/or acknowledging emotional or challenging topics that may arise in class meetings.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt> <p>Sample Language</p> </dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I will have my camera on during Zoom sessions, and invite you to keep your camera on if you are comfortable doing so. Whether or not your camera is on, your active participation in the course is essential. Please show initiative, active listening, and courtesy through the following: </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use a headset or earbuds to be sure you can hear and be heard easily when speaking</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use the chat to ask questions, report problems, or whenever directed as part of a class activity. Keep chat messages respectful, concise, and relevant. I’m not judging your grammar, but remember you’re writing in an academic environment, even in the chat box. If our meeting is recorded, the public chat is included. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use the ‘reactions’ buttons (clapping, thumbs up) if appropriate!</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Keep your mic muted when you aren’t speaking, to lessen distractions (and forgive me if I occasionally have to mute you if you forget).</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use the ‘raise hand’ button whenever you need to ask a question during lecture. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Know that when two people talk at the same time in Zoom, neither can be easily heard. It takes a while, but we’ll get into a rhythm of leaving time between speakers.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>In this online environment, I will probably ‘cold call’ students more often than I would in the classroom. It can be hard for me to know who is ready to speak, so I may call on you when you’re not expecting it. If you need to ‘pass’ on a question once or twice, that’s OK.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>In our course, there will be many opportunities to discuss ideas in large and small groups. To support a productive, respectful, and learning-focused discussion, I ask that you participate with the following classroom norms, which we will review and add to together as a class:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Listen respectfully. Comments that you make (whether asking for clarification, sharing critiques, or expanding on a point) should reflect that you have paid attention to the previous speakers’ comments.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Be open to changing your perspectives based on what you learn from others.</span></span></span></span></span></span> <span><span><span><span><span><span>Understand that we are bound to make mistakes in this space, as anyone does when approaching complex tasks or learning new skills. Strive to see your mistakes and others’ as valuable elements of the learning process.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Understand that your words have effects on others. Speak with care.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Understand that others will come to these discussions with different experiences from yours. Be careful about assumptions and generalizations you make based only on your own experience.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Understand that there are different approaches to solving problems. If you are uncertain about someone else’s approach, ask a question to explore areas of uncertainty.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Differentiate between opinion--which everyone has--and informed knowledge, which comes from sustained experience, study, and practice. Hold your opinions lightly and with humility.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>… more TBD when we meet together as a group.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol></dd> </dl><h2><a id="Class Recordings" name="Class Recordings">Class Recordings</a></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Will you make recordings of live sessions available to students? How will you and the students access and use class recordings in a respectful and productive manner? Consider remote and quarantined/isolated students’ need to access course content via recordings of live sessions. You may want to discuss with students the role of recordings in your particular course. <a href="https://learningdesign.as.virginia.edu/recording-class-sessions" target="_blank">Review these tips</a> for recording class sessions. Additional guidance on the recording of class session and distribution of course materials is provided by </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://uvapolicy.virginia.edu/policy/PROV-005" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>UVA policy</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt> <p>Sample Language</p> </dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I intend to record our live sessions for the sake of students who are unable to attend. Recordings will be available in Collab Online Meetings under “Cloud Recordings.” Recordings cannot be shared or moved, and will always be password protected. The default settings in Zoom only record the face of the active speaker. During class, I may pause recording at times to allow for everyone to feel comfortable discussing sensitive topics. I encourage you to contact me directly with any concerns about recordings. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h2><a id="Physical Health and Space" name="Physical Health and Space">Physical Health and Space</a></h2> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>If in-person, how are students expected to interact? Will students enter and exit the room in a particular way? Will they have responsibilities for cleaning their spaces?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What will be your protocol for reminding students to comply with behavioral expectations?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>During this time, your personal and academic lives may look different than they did prior to March 2020. We will face challenges as a learning community, but I am hopeful that we can also continue to learn, connect, and grow together. I am committed to maintaining a healthy and equitable learning environment for all students, faculty, and staff.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Your health and well-being are a priority; please take care of yourself and monitor your health daily in the HOOS Health Check app. If you are ill or expect that you have been exposed to COVID-19, please stay home, notify me, and contact the Student Health and Wellness Center (434-924-5362) so that you can receive appropriate care. I recognize the need for some time off may also arise if someone close to you is sick or passes away. For any of these situations, we will work together and with your Association Dean to develop a plan to make sure you’re looked after and can continue to make progress in the course. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>To care for our community, we will follow <a href="https://returntogrounds.virginia.edu/" target="_blank">UVA’s policies</a> in place for health and safety</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Actions like observing social distancing, washing and sanitizing our hands frequently, wiping down our desks and seats when possible, and properly wearing face coverings are critical for our environment to be one where you all can engage and learn. I will do my best to help you comply with these protective measures, which may include gentle reminders about keeping your mask on and cleaning your work space.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The University and I will be carefully monitoring our situation, and we may need to adjust our course and policies as necessary in response to what’s working and what isn’t to protect the safety and well-being of our learning community.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h2><a id="Technology and Accessibility" name="Technology and Accessibility">Technology and Accessibility</a></h2> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What technology is required for your course, and how will you ensure your students have access? Consider hardware and software, memory and performance (i.e., can the software actually run on the computer that the student has?), and internet connectivity.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Where can students acquire assistance getting equipment if they need it?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How can students access support for the tools used in the course?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What should students do if technology fails them (e.g., they lose their Zoom connection)? Consider having a written backup plan for students to follow.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How will you make your online lectures and digital materials accessible? (<a href="https://accessibility.virginia.edu/digital-environment" target="_blank">resources</a></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>)</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>What do students need to know about the accessibility of your course? Do you rely more on particular modalities (e.g., reading) that may present barriers for some students?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt> <p>Sample Language</p> </dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>To effectively engage in this course, you will need regular use of a computer and higher-speed (not dial-up) Internet. If you require assistance, please see Additional Student Support resources below. For Collab tools, the following browsers are recommended: Google Chrome (no reported issues), Mozilla Firefox (no reported issues), Microsoft Edge (few reported issues), and Mac Safari (few reported issues). </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>For information on the American Rescue Plan Act, Bridge Scholarships, and Emergency Loans, please visit </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://sfs.virginia.edu/sfs-operational-updates" target="_blank">Student Financial Services Operational Updates</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Online, we’ll use our textbook website </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>to complete some activities. For all other online activities, including tests, we will use <span><span>UVACollab</span></span>. All the tools we use will be linked in our course Collab site. Please log in and have a look around, to locate the syllabus and the weekly activity schedule. Collab has </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/students" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>help resources</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> and </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="mailto:collab-support@virginia.edu" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>assistance via email</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> during regular business hours. It is my goal to create a learning experience that is as accessible as possible—</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>{insert accessibility measures specific to your course, e.g.,  all videos will be captioned, and synchronous meetings will have multiple ways for you to engage (voice, chat, video)}</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Please meet with me to explore your options if you anticipate any challenges meeting course requirements or interacting with the course materials.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you need assistance using any of the tools for our class, I am happy to work with you. You can also find resources for each below:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><a href="https://in.virginia.edu/helpdesk" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>ITS (Technical Support)</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Priority phone support will be given via 434-924-HELP for students who are in an online class or attempting to connect to one that is starting soon. If you are not in an online class, contact the <a href="https://in.virginia.edu/helpdesk" target="_blank">ITS Help Desk</a> (chat, email, online)</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></li> <li><a href="https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Zoom Support</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/students" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Collab Student Support</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a> <ul><li><a href="https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/students/l/634312-essential-tips-for-taking-online-tests-in-uvacollab" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Help taking Tests and Quizzes in Collab</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> </ul></li> <li><a href="https://tinyurl.com/StudentGuideCanvas" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Canvas Student Support</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Live sessions will be held via Zoom, which you access via Collab’s Online Meetings tool. While this platform is generally stable, problems might arise. If you have trouble accessing class or lose your connection, please take these steps:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Try again to reconnect to class, using the Zoom link OR the phone number that you can access when you view the course meeting invitation in Collab Online Meetings. If you get stuck in the waiting room, text a classmate so they can let me know that you are trying to reconnect. </span></span></span></span></span></span> <span><span><span><span><span><span>If you’re still unable to access class, plan to watch the class recording instead. Recordings are usually available within 3 hours of the end of class time, in the Online Meetings “Cloud Recordings” section.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><hr /><h5><a id="Student Support Services" name="Student Support Services">Student Support Services</a></h5> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>What on-Grounds support resources are available to students, and which of these will you want to include in your syllabus? Review this <a href="https://myuva-my.sharepoint.com/:w:/r/personal/hf6v_virginia_edu/_layouts/15/guestaccess.aspx?e=g5umfe&amp;share=ETYKhjkTkbtJhsnvWXdOhJkBrCsh5bHvGyNtKVk4tstJdQ" target="_blank"><span><span>document</span></span></a></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> for a sampling of commonly used student support resources.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h6>Academic Support for Students</h6> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How can you help students develop into successful remote learners? What particular skills will they need to rely on or develop (e.g., communication, organization, time management, camera presence)? </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>How can students access further academic support? Consider including links to the Writing Center or drop-in TA office hours if your department offers them.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Online learning differs from classroom learning in important ways. It’s a good idea to gauge your preparation for online learning before the semester begins, so that you can identify areas where you may need more support. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><a href="https://collab.its.virginia.edu/access/content/group/e8bdc184-6f0d-43e1-bc77-57d10110aa6f/Online%20Readiness%20Quiz/Introduction" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span>Online Learning Readiness Self-Check</span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span>: Are you ready for online learning? Use this survey to understand your preparedness to use technology, be self-motivated, manage your time, and seek out help in online coursework.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>UVA Total Advising has resources about </span></span></span><a href="https://advising.virginia.edu/resources/preparing-remote" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span>preparing to be a remote student</span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span> and </span></span></span><a href="https://advising.virginia.edu/resources/remote-communicate/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span>effective communication</span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span> as a remote student.</span></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Additional academic support is available to you: </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1I98KrKT3syC2VvAXI34_kQghUMwIndvP5MzsLVRZyR4/edit" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>COVID-19: Student Resources</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </dd> </dl><h6>Mental Health and Well-being</h6> <ol><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Where can students access mental health resources?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Where can students access financial resources?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li>Where can students access resources related to food insecurity?</li> </ol><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt>Sample Language</dt> <dd> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you are feeling overwhelmed, stressed, or isolated, there are many individuals here to help. The Student Health and Wellness Center offers </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://studenthealth.virginia.edu/caps" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> for its students; call 434-243-5150 to speak with an on-call counselor and/or schedule an appointment. If you prefer to speak anonymously, you can call Madison House’s </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="http://www.helplineuva.com/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>HELP Line</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> at any hour of any day: 434-295-TALK. Alternatively, you can call or text the </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Disaster Distress Helpline</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> (1-800-985-5990, or text TalkWithUs to 66746) to connect with a trained crisis counselor; this is toll free, multilingual, and confidential, available to all residents in the US and its territories.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>For information on CARES Act Student Emergency Funding, Bridge Scholarships, and Emergency Loans, please visit</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://sfs.virginia.edu/sfs-operational-updates" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Student Financial Services Operational Updates</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>. You might also be eligible for an </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://odos.virginia.edu/honor-loan-application" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Honor Loan</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>Any student who has difficulty affording groceries or accessing sufficient food to eat every day, or lacks a safe, stable place to live and believes this may affect their performance in the course is urged to contact the <a href="https://odos.virginia.edu/food-insecurity" target="_blank">Dean of Students</a> for support. Furthermore, please notify me if you are comfortable in doing so.</p> </dd> </dl></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/556" hreflang="en">Technology</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/551" hreflang="en">instructor</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 06 Aug 2020 19:18:18 +0000 ks8yx 396 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Redesigning Your Course for Online https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/redesigning-your-course-online <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Redesigning Your Course for Online</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 05/13/2020 - 14:55</span> <div class="layout layout--twocol-70-30"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first layout__region--70 region-small"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field__label visually-hidden">Body</div> <div class="field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The default structure of an in-person course works to keep a course present for instructors and students: it won’t fall too far out of our minds if we know we must occupy a common physical space two or three times per week. Most of us have also been socialized to learn predominantly, if not entirely, in face-to-face environments, so we take their organizing structures for granted. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>In online environments, keeping a course present can be more difficult. It can be easy for students to forget to log in, and to feel isolated when they do, as though they have been left on their own to work through material independently. </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In order to create a dynamic, present course that fosters a sense of community for instructor and students, it helps to intentionally design and foreground the ways that you will interact with students, the ways that students will interact with one another, and the ways that students will interact with the course material.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="layout__region layout__region--second layout__region--30 region-small"> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:text" data-inline-block-uuid="d40d98a8-250c-4845-82b6-f29f1c1a4421" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--text"> <h2>CTE Support</h2> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/programs-grants/c3design" target="_blank">c<sup>3</sup>Design</a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/resources/asynchronous-workshop-creating-well-paced-socially-connected-courses" target="_blank">Creating Well-Paced, Socially Connected Courses</a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/programs-grants/teaching-consultation-program" target="_blank">Consultations</a></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content region-full"> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:text" data-inline-block-uuid="0e665904-36d0-45ea-ad0f-4bea4909a909" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--text"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div alt="CoI framework" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-embed-display-settings="person_profile_400x400 file" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="58a20b8d-9261-420e-a61d-b5ebc0ec2b38" data-langcode="en" title="Community of Inquiry framework" class="align-right embedded-entity"> <a href="/sites/g/files/jsddwu206/files/2020-05/CoI%20framework.jpg"><img src="/sites/g/files/jsddwu206/files/styles/person_profile_400x400/public/2020-05/CoI%20framework.jpg?itok=I6rTs8rZ" width="400" height="400" alt="CoI framework" title="Community of Inquiry framework" loading="lazy" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-person-profile-400x400" /></a> </div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use the three perspectives below to reimagine your existing syllabus and/or course plans. Click on each presence for a deeper dive.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ol><li><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="#Instructor presence">Instructor presence.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong><span><span><span><span><span><span> How will you, as the instructor, be present to students in the remote course? This includes interacting with students in the learning environment, providing timely and personalized feedback, and performing direct instruction.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="#Social presence">Social presence.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong><span><span><span><span><span><span> How will your students perceive each other as real human beings experiencing the course together as a community? You can create opportunities for students to interact with each other via discussion groups, study pairs, collaborative assignments, and informal digital spaces such as a “student lounge” discussion forum. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="#Cognitive presence">Cognitive presence.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong><span><span><span><span><span><span> How will you and your students construct meaning? More so than in a face-to-face environment, it is important to deliberately structure and clearly communicate opportunities to think about course material, explore ideas, contextualize and integrate those ideas, and/or test and apply them. Cognitive presence is enabled by effective teaching and social presences.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ol><p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Why should I use these presences as lenses?</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>These three presences comprise a conceptual framework called the <a href="https://coi.athabascau.ca/" target="_blank">Community of Inquiry framework</a>. In applying this framework to actual online courses, <a href="https://coi.athabascau.ca/publications/coi-papers/" target="_blank">research</a> has shown that the </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>intersection</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> of the three presences has a strong positive influence on students’ experience in their online courses. Deep learning requires each presence.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <hr /><h2><span><span><span><span><span><span>Examples and what to look for</span></span></span></span></span></span></h2> <h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Instructor presence" name="Instructor presence">Instructor Presence</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Take a moment to reflect on your </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>instructor</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> or </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>teaching presence</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> in your typical face-to-face context. What are the things that reassure your students that you’re present as an instructor and that you care about their learning? Your strong organizational skills? Strategic use of gestures? Improvisation in response to student questions? Witty banter? Which of these strengths are difficult to convey in an online context? What elements of your personality come through? Consider deliberately planning how students will know you are there with them in the course at every step along the way. Active instructor presence can be created when instructors adopt roles that </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>amplify, curate, aggregate, filter</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>, and </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>model</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> (Cormier and Siemans 2010).</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you already have a syllabus, look across the course components and learning activities and mark where your instructor presence plays major and minor roles. Some effective ways to translate these to the virtual setting include:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>A well-organized course website</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Can students intuitively navigate the course to find ways to communicate, assignments, and frequently accessed resources? Tip: ask a friend or colleague to look at your site and give feedback on its navigability and accessibility.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Weekly 2-3 minute check-in videos/messages</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> that help students understand the organizational framework and major course ideas of the week, as well as get to know you as a person.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Regular feedback on discussion board posts</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Will students see your comments on a daily, weekly, or irregular basis? What kinds of comments can they expect from you?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Synchronous, drop-in office hours</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Leave a regularly occurring  Zoom meeting "open" for students to stop by, just like your physical office.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Instructional videos/podcasts/notes with your face/voice/handwriting</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Even if you use external resources for content, consider recording short introductions of just a minute or two so that students see your face and hear your voice. Let your personality come through. For a lower bandwidth option, you can scan your handwritten notes to personalize the experience. Concise diagrams or concept maps with your unique style can be memorable. Authenticity is more important than high-production videos.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider these smaller interactions to support your teaching presence</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Timely feedback.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Personalized interactions (e.g., responding to students by name, either synchronously or asynchronously: </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>“Jerome, your comment really highlights the intersection of the two perspectives we read.”</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>).</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Redirecting student discussion when it gets off track. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>More examples of instructor presence</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Community College Research Center </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/media/k2/attachments/effective-online-instructor-presence.pdf" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Creating an Effective Online Instructor Presence</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> (PDF)</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Cormiers and Siemens, </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://er.educause.edu/articles/2010/8/through-the-open-door-open-courses-as-research-learning-and-engagement" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Through the Open Door: Open Courses as Research, Learning, and Engagement</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><a href="https://er.educause.edu/articles/2010/8/through-the-open-door-open-courses-as-research-learning-and-engagement" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span> </span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> </ul></dd> </dl><h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Social presence" name="Social presence">Social Presence</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Think back to the last time you had an enduring virtual social experience. What made you feel connected to the other people? If you are a fan of </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massively_multiplayer_online_game" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>multiplayer online video games</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> or online discussion and support communities, this may be familiar. But for many people the idea of a virtual social presence is a new one. How will you invite students into the learning space? Will students communicate with each other in writing? Via video? Synchronously? Asynchronously? How often, and about what topics? When will the communication be focused on learning outcomes and when might they be focused on developing community? When students are not sharing physical space regularly, they may not feel part of a class community unless you are strategically and intentionally creating spaces for that community to develop. Consider building into your course timeline dedicated structures and opportunities for creating and reinforcing social presence. Some suggestions for building and maintaining social presence include:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Build rapport and model social interaction</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> early in the course using icebreakers or a “getting to know you” video or audio recording. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Set the expectation for regular interactions.</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> Spread interactions throughout the semester so that they become routine. At least some of the time, make the interaction itself, not the content of the interaction, the primary point. This is especially important with written interactions, such as discussion board posts: if you are grading these for content, they are unlikely to have the kind of natural back and forth that most easily builds community.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Build in varied opportunities to interact</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Beware of Zoom fatigue and the toll excessive screen time can have on mental and physical health. Aim for </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="/inclusive-virtual-teaching"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>inclusive and equitable practices</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> with regular check-in activities, and be aware of the ways that student-student communication can enhance or hinder other students’ experiences (e.g., if students make biased comments in a discussion board).</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Identify and highlight which of your learning objectives rely on social presence </span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>(e.g., practicing discourse in </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="/discussion-courses"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>discussion courses</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> or working collaboratively for </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="/group-work-and-collaborative-learning">group work</a>)</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><strong><span><span> </span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Be intentional about how assignments can effectively integrate content and interaction. Use transparent assignments to help students see these connections. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider these smaller interactions to support social presence</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Include an occasional family pet cameo in your whole class correspondence.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Encourage students to respond to each other by name.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Facilitate mechanisms for students to form study groups (e.g., a discussion board, a Zoom room that is always open for them to drop in to study “together,” etc.).</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> </dl><h3><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Cognitive presence" name="Cognitive presence">Cognitive Presence</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></h3> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Cognitive presence has to do with the course material: how present</span></span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">—</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>that is, how coherent, connected, and engaging</span></span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">—</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>are the various kinds of learning you’re asking students to do? Generally speaking, most instructors with face-to-face experience find this aspect of planning an online course most obvious, and they feel comfortable planning for the cognitive presence. Remember, though, that in an online environment you may need to be more structured, intentional, and varied as you give students opportunities to learn course content or practice new skills, receive feedback on those processes, and iteratively move toward understanding. You will have fewer opportunities to “read the room” and check understanding, and it may be more difficult to pivot if an approach isn’t connecting with students. As a result, plan frequent, deliberate, and </span></span><em><span>flexible</span></em><span><span> ways to check in with students about their learning. Fortunately, not only is cognitive presence in the virtual classroom supported by instructor and social presence, but also many strategies for effective teaching and learning you already use translate to this context:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Use multiple representations to teach new concepts and ideas</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Readings, videos, activities, discussions, assignments, and so forth should all reinforce one another and give students multiple opportunities to make meaning of and construct their knowledge of the course material.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Give frequent, varied, and low-stakes opportunities for students to get feedback on their work.</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> This might come in the form of assessments that you give individual feedback on, but it may also involve self or peer feedback, as well as instructor feedback to the full class. The important point is to give you and your students many chances to see how they’re doing as they progress through the class.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Use principles of transparency</span></span></strong></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> to make assignments and instructions as clear as possible to students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Make sure students are actively engaging with the course material.</span></span></strong><span><span><span> Students make strong contributions to cognitive presence when they ask questions, participate in knowledge co-creation, and give feedback to each other. This can happen in a variety of online formats</span></span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-size:11pt; font-variant:normal; white-space:pre-wrap"><span style="font-family:Arial"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-weight:400"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="text-decoration:none">—</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>discussion boards, synchronous meetings, reflective writing, and office hours.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider these smaller interactions to support cognitive presence</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Ask students to write informal reading responses or contribute discussion questions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use exam wrappers or assignment reflections to build students’ metacognitive awareness.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use classroom assessment techniques such as minute papers, concept maps, and clearest/muddiest points to give you and your students quick feedback on their learning.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> </dl><h2><span><span><span><span><span><span>Takeaways</span></span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Using the three presences above as a lens on your existing syllabus will help you identify which aspects of your face-to-face course will easily make the move to online and those that require re-thinking for the remote context. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2>Additional Resources</h2> <ul><li><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/programs-grants/c3design" target="_blank">c<sup>3</sup>Design</a>: Created by the CTE, a highly interactive online learning environment designed to guide you through the iterative, dynamic, and scholarly process of learning-focused course design. You can currently work through the program independently and reimagine your next course—whether it's face to face, hybrid, or online.</li> <li><a href="https://cte.virginia.edu/resources/asynchronous-workshop-creating-well-paced-socially-connected-courses" target="_blank">Creating Well-Paced, Socially Connected Courses</a>: CTE self-guided workshop designed to be a compact remote learning experience that addresses common barriers for instructors who are accustomed to in-person teaching.</li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>For self-guided step-by-step design process for online courses, try:</span></span></span></span></span></span> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>William and Mary’s </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://sites.google.com/email.wm.edu/convert-your-course" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Convert Your Course</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://sites.google.com/email.wm.edu/convert-your-course" target="_blank"> site</a>, or </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Arizona State University’s </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://teachonline.asu.edu/online-toolkit-guided-process/" target="_blank">Designing for Online Toolkit</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>To read more about evidence-based online teaching, we recommend </span></span></span></span></span></span><em><span><span><span><span><span><span>Online Teaching At Its Best</span></span></span></span></span></span></em><span><span><span><span><span><span> by Nilson and Goodson. The </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/UVA/detail.action?docID=5144407" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>eBook is available online</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> through UVA Library.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>For tips on balancing instructor presence and workload, we recommend reading </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/balancing-act-managing-instructor-presence-and-workload-when-creating-an-interactive-community-of-learners/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Managing Instructor Presence and Workload, Boosting Student Engagement</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:curated_links" data-inline-block-uuid="0b1f6eed-f0bc-4c47-b240-01a3e337edd2" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--curated-links"> <div class="field field--name-field-url-cl field--type-link field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://us20.campaign-archive.com/?u=59708c86efd03e38dac5e978d&amp;id=c0706fb579" target="_blank">Creating a Thoughtful Online Teaching Persona</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://us20.campaign-archive.com/?u=59708c86efd03e38dac5e978d&amp;id=49f14b1488" target="_blank">Creating Social Presence</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 13 May 2020 18:55:13 +0000 ks8yx 356 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Group Work and Collaborative Learning https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/group-work-and-collaborative-learning <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Group Work and Collaborative Learning</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 05/07/2020 - 16:59</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="views-element-container block block-views block-views-block--important-notice-notice-view-block" data-block-plugin-id="views_block:important_notice-notice_view_block"> <div><div class="view view-important-notice view-id-important_notice view-display-id-notice_view_block js-view-dom-id-bba8b34066dd4a7e26897b584346c05e862517a2d091e710297bef7ab86a7ff0"> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2>Why use group work?</h2> <p>As you think about functional and effective ways to transition collaboration and group work online, consider the primary goals for collaborative learning in your course. For example:</p> <ul><li> <p><em>Are groups working together to support each other’s learning? To build community? To create a product?</em></p> </li> <li> <p><em>How will your assessment(s) reflect the value you place on the group-related parts of the course?</em></p> </li> </ul><p> </p> <table><thead><tr><th style="width: 120px;">FACE-TO-FACE PLAN</th> <th style="width: 156px;"><strong>SAMPLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES</strong></th> <th style="width: 173px;">SYNCHRONOUS POSSIBILITIES</th> <th style="width: 180px;">ASYNCHRONOUS POSSIBILITIES</th> </tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width: 122px;"><strong>Collaborative learning</strong></td> <td style="width: 158px;"> <p><i>Work together </i>to solve a complex problem or produce a creative product.</p>   <p><em>Share </em>and <em>contribute </em>knowledge about course content.</p> </td> <td style="width: 176px;"> <p><strong>Formation. </strong>Use a survey to assign groups based on student availability.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Communication. </strong>Groups meet on their own in a weekly synchronous <a href="https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/sitetools/l/634165-what-is-the-chat-tool" target="_blank">text chat</a> or video chat.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Shared notes.</strong> Students contribute notes with a shared document (synchronous or asynchronous).</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Discussion and problem solving.</strong> Assign each group a problem or discussion prompt. Groups can solve an individual problem, then share with larger class synchronously or asynchronously.</p> </td> <td style="width: 182px;"> <p><strong>Communication.</strong> Group members record a series of short, asynchronous videos to communicate with each other or post on discussion boards (such as with Piazza, <a href="https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/sitetools/c/161646" target="_blank">Collab Discussions</a>, or <a href="https://learningtech.virginia.edu/tools/voicethread" target="_blank">VoiceThread</a>).</p> <p><br /><strong>Jigsaw. </strong>Each group member is assigned a reading or topic. These “experts” teach their topic to their group members with a recorded lesson or assignment that they create (synchronous or asynchronous).</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p><span style="color: rgb(20, 30, 60); font-size: 1.625rem;">Using this practice, how do I...</span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>create equitable and inclusive learning experiences for my students, particularly in difficult and uncertain times?</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><strong>Be intentional with group formation.</strong> In most cases, it is better to assign groups than to let students self-select. Create a Collab/Canvas survey or use a tool like <a href="https://info.catme.org/" target="_blank">CATME</a> to allow you to group students. If you intend for students to meet with their groups synchronously, use their schedule availability as the primary grouping characteristic. Other characteristics such as interests or familiarity with the topic can be important to consider. Avoid further isolating students who may be marginalized based on their identities.</li> <li><strong>Provide examples of productive and supportive interactions. </strong>Explain the importance of individuals’ voices being heard and acknowledge the different lived experiences of group members. Have groups plan for how they will ensure inclusion of group members who may not be able to attend a synchronous meeting or identify when one of their group members is unable to participate due to personal reasons.</li> <li style="list-style-type:disc"><strong><a href="https://ctl.wustl.edu/resources/using-roles-in-group-work/" target="_blank">Assigning roles</a></strong> can alleviate uncertainty and ensure everyone has something to contribute.</li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>acknowledge students as whole people and design for their social, emotional, and intellectual development?</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><strong>Recognize that students will have a range of prior knowledge and experience with collaboration.</strong> Don’t assume that they already know how to productively work together. </li> <li><strong>Enable group members to get to know each other.</strong> Use structure assignments or discussion prompts. Remote circumstances make this especially important, as no face-to-face impromptu discussions are possible; all synchronous interactions must be intentionally scheduled.</li> <li><strong>Make use of student motivations.</strong> Allow students to decide on acceptable modes of communication and accountability with their group members, such as through group work contracts that they create and agree to.</li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>allow students to make connections and organize their knowledge in meaningful ways, recognizing their prior learning and addressing any inaccuracies?</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><strong>Design opportunities for students to authentically work together.</strong> The best collaborative assignments require students to work together on a "group-worthy" task. Use shared slides or documents (like a Google Doc, digital whiteboard, or <a href="https://learningtech.virginia.edu/tools/voicethread" target="_blank">VoiceThread</a>) where groups of students can collect their thoughts (e.g., synchronously in breakout groups), and then, if applicable, <a href="/student-presentations">present</a> to the instructor or larger group.</li> <li><strong>Be cognizant of the number of tools students are being asked to use</strong> and learn in order to engage in group work. The cognitive energy it takes to engage with the technology may take away from the intended learning.</li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>enable students to acquire and practice skills and receive feedback? </span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><strong>Be intentional with activity design.</strong> The collaborative activities should align with and enable students to make progress toward the course objectives.</li> <li><strong>Set purposeful, incremental check-ins for groups.</strong> This is important, particularly for larger complex assignments, to ensure students are on track. With no opportunities for in-person, informal conversations, these accountability checks are crucial to students' success with the project. These check-ins may also identify any groups or individuals who are struggling.</li> <li><strong>Provide opportunities for group members to give and receive feedback.</strong> The feedback should originate from each other and from you and should address both content and group dynamics.</li> </ul></dd> </dl></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:curated_links" data-inline-block-uuid="d1502481-56d4-4ea5-95ab-875284029b66" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--curated-links"> <h2>Additional Resources</h2> <div class="field field--name-field-url-cl field--type-link field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/u6698509" target="_blank">Collaborative Learning Techniques</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://styluspub.presswarehouse.com/browse/book/9781620368473/High-Impact-Practices-in-Online-Education" target="_blank">High-Impact Practices in Online Education</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://teamwork.umn.edu/" target="_blank">Group Project Survival Guide for Students </a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://facultyguidetoteamwork.umn.edu/" target="_blank">Group Project Guide for Faculty</a></div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/536" hreflang="en">collaboration</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/6" hreflang="en">student presentations</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 07 May 2020 20:59:30 +0000 ks8yx 341 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu What are some tips for attending a Zoom class as a student? https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/node/121 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What are some tips for attending a Zoom class as a student?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 04/03/2020 - 10:27</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Read Collab's tips here: <a href="https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/communication/l/1215011-tips-for-attending-class-in-zoom">https://uvacollab.screenstepslive.com/s/help/m/communication/l/1215011-tips-for-attending-class-in-zoom</a></p><br /><br /><br /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-faq-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Topic(s)</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/16" hreflang="en">Zoom</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/71" hreflang="en">Best Practices</a></div> </div> Fri, 03 Apr 2020 14:27:58 +0000 Anonymous 121 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Discussion Courses and Sections https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/discussion-courses-and-sections <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Discussion Courses and Sections</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 04/02/2020 - 15:10</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="views-element-container block block-views block-views-block--important-notice-notice-view-block" data-block-plugin-id="views_block:important_notice-notice_view_block"> <div><div class="view view-important-notice view-id-important_notice view-display-id-notice_view_block js-view-dom-id-e085c0f80bf1f36adeeb6d59cd881aa35c0817823a088c7be1e80a6793ad6b0b"> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2>Why do we have seminar-style classes and sections?</h2> <p>Relatively small, discussion-based classes, as well as discussion sections of larger classes, have a number of advantages for student learning. As you think about the best way to transition your course online, consider your primary course goals. For example:</p> <ul><li><em>Is it important that students engage in discussion in real time through speaking and listening? Are there aspects that could be moved to other formats (e.g. writing, recording audio/video)?</em></li> <li><em>Is it important that the entire class engage in a single discussion? Could small group discussions also accomplish learning goals?</em></li> <li><em>Are there also lecture elements to your course or section? How will you integrate these?</em></li> <li><i>If multiple TAs are leading discussion sections in a larger class, how important is it that students in those sections engage in discussion in the same way?</i></li> <li><i>How will students know or contribute to community norms for discussions?</i></li> </ul><p> </p> <table><thead><tr><th style="width: 113px;">FACE-TO-FACE PLAN</th> <th style="width: 172px;">SAMPLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES</th> <th style="width: 166px;">SYNCHRONOUS POSSIBILITIES</th> <th style="width: 178px;">ASYNCHRONOUS POSSIBILITIES</th> </tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width: 115px;"><strong>Small, interactive, discussion-based class</strong></td> <td style="width: 174px;"> <p>Orally <em>communicate</em> about course ideas.</p>   <p><em>Recognize the value</em> of multiple perspectives and interpretations.</p>   <p>Actively <em>analyze and debate</em> complex ideas.</p> <p><br /><em>Collaboratively generate</em> questions, ideas, and analyses.</p> </td> <td style="width: 168px;"> <p>Conduct class discussions on Zoom. In a very small class, a full class interactive discussion is possible on Zoom. For classes with more than ~15 students, consider using Zoom breakout rooms. Written synchronous discussions are possible in Collab/Canvas Chat, Piazza, and Microsoft Teams.</p> </td> <td style="width: 180px;">Use Collab/Canvas Discussions, Piazza, or Microsoft Teams for asynchronous written discussions. Use Annotations tool for written interaction with text, image, or film. For asynchronous oral grappling with ideas, students can audio record think-aloud sessions.</td> </tr></tbody></table><p><span style="color: rgb(20, 30, 60); font-size: 1.625rem;">Using this practice, how do I...</span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>create equitable and inclusive learning experiences for my students, particularly in difficult and uncertain times?</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li>On the first day of class, work with your students to build community norms for engaging in productive discussions. <a href="http://crlt.umich.edu/examples-discussion-guidelines" target="_blank">See examples of classroom interaction guidelines</a> from the University of Michigan.</li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>For a variety of reasons--among others, variable internet access, different time zones, and home-based responsibilities and distractions--your students may have inequitable access to full participation in synchronous, Zoom-based discussions. Consider offering both synchronous and asynchronous ways of interacting with course material.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Wherever possible, build in multiple and flexible ways for students to engage with course material and demonstrate their learning. This helps all students, but it will be particularly important for students for whom this semester is proving especially difficult (e.g.., students who are themselves ill or are caring for ill family members, students who require accessibility accommodations that are difficult to manage in an online environment, students whose homes are unsafe or otherwise not conducive to their learning, etc.).</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use anonymous surveys to ask students how they are best able to engage with the course material and make class decisions based on this feedback. Check in with students regularly to make sure the course is continuing to support their learning.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>acknowledge students as whole people and design for their social, emotional, and intellectual development?</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>The shift to online formats requires students to engage differently than they would in face-to-face classrooms. Most tasks take longer, and particularly if you are shifting from in-person oral discussion to writing-based interaction, you will need to assign less material. Writing and reading takes more time and effort than speaking and listening.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Students are adapting to many changes and stressors right now, and all of these can affect their capacity for academic work. The “same” course work may be much more difficult to complete now.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Increase student motivation by providing opportunities for students to connect course material to their interests and lives.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Allow students to propose new, and (if necessary) individualized ways of engaging in the course, in order to tap into their intrinsic motivation and work within any constraints posed by their current living situation. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>allow students to make connections and organize their knowledge in meaningful ways, recognizing their prior learning and addressing any inaccuracies?</span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>An in-person seminar is often an environment that encourages students to collaboratively make connections and organize information. In an online seminar, these opportunities will likely need to be more carefully structured. Give multiple opportunities in different modalities for students to do this type of work, along with clear instructions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>In an in-person seminar, instructors can recognize students’ knowledge and correct any inaccuracies through listening to and participating in discussion. In online environments, these opportunities may need to be more structured. Consider using polling, a discussion board like <a href="https://learningtech.virginia.edu/tools/piazza" target="_blank">Piazza</a>, and shorter discussions with smaller groups to do some of this work. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> <dt><span><span><span><span><span><span>enable students to acquire and practice skills and receive feedback? </span></span></span></span></span></span></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>As much as possible, give students low-stakes opportunities to practice the work you want to see from them, along with frequent, formative feedback. This will be especially true for any new work that the online shift is asking them to do (e.g., contributing to discussion forums, recording think-alouds, etc.). Especially if it is important that they do these things in a particular way, give clear criteria, feedback, and opportunities to practice.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> </dl><p> </p> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:curated_links" data-inline-block-uuid="367b896c-966a-475e-bcc9-66ef7f7c040d" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--curated-links"> <h2>Additional Resources</h2> <div class="field field--name-field-url-cl field--type-link field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.proxy01.its.virginia.edu/lib/uva/detail.action?docID=4306433" target="_blank">The Discussion Book: 50 Great Ways to Get People Talking</a></div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/561" hreflang="en">discussion</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/571" hreflang="en">seminar</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">assessment</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/466" hreflang="en">breakout rooms</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/21" hreflang="en">inclusive teaching</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/16" hreflang="en">Zoom</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 02 Apr 2020 19:10:59 +0000 ks8yx 81 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Inclusive Virtual Teaching https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/inclusive-virtual-teaching <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Inclusive Virtual Teaching</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 03/31/2020 - 14:34</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The current pandemic offers both opportunities and challenges for instructors committed to equitable, inclusive teaching. On the one hand, lessons of interconnectivity abound as the pandemic reminds of our shared humanity and confirms that our collective well-being depends on individual responsibility as well as communal action. On the other hand, crisis and stress reduce our cognitive and emotional bandwidth, causing us to rely more heavily on mental shortcuts and bias, thus increasing the risk that we reify oppressive structures.</p> <p>The following strategies offer a few concrete and creative ways to intentionally amplify human connection, acknowledge varied and divergent experiences, and mindfully mitigate the negative impact of diminished bandwidth.</p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>How can I demonstrate my value of inclusivity and equity in the classroom from the beginning of my course?</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Check out our </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1sj3wcICepFVO_Eygnq9w3srDgv2zXTmP/view?usp=sharing; target=blank" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>First Day of Class</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> checklist for specific ideas.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider writing a welcome letter or creating a short video to introduce yourself and your course to students. You can use the media gallery in Collab/Canvas or </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://learningtech.virginia.edu/tools/flipgrid" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Flipgrid</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> to invite students to respond with their own short get-to-know-you videos, or you can open up a forum in Collab/Canvas for everyone to respond. Provide a template to help students consider scope and content, and be sure to provide options‒not all students will be comfortable with video or with writing.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Create a "Syllabus" discussion forum where students can ask questions about the syllabus. This allows you to answer questions one time while clarifying expectations for all students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider spending some time to set up and practice interactive formats that you will return to throughout the semester. If you anticipate using a chat page in Collab/Canvas, set up a chat about favorite music or fun facts for students to get to know each other. Require everyone to post so they can get used to using this format. If you will have synchronous meetings, take time to set expectations for dialogue and practice moving in and out of breakout rooms.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul><p> </p> <center><strong><a href="#Connect students to students">Connect students to students</a> | <a href="#Connect students to instructor">Connect students to instructor</a><br /><a href="#Connect students to field">Connect students to field</a> | <a href="#Affirm students’ values and goals">Affirm students’ values and goals</a><br /><a href="#Explain expectations for assessments">Explain expectations for assessments</a> | <a href="#Explain expectations for participation">Explain expectations for participation</a></strong></center> <p> </p> <table><thead><tr><th>GENERAL STRATEGY</th> <th>SYNCHRONOUS APPROACHES</th> <th>ASYNCHRONOUS APPROACHES</th> </tr></thead><tbody><tr><td><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Connect students to students" name="Connect students to students">Connect students to students</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong></td> <td> <p><strong>LESS COMPLEX</strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Create a check-in or check-out question for students to answer via chat. Optional: follow with the phrase checked in/out.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><span><em><span>Ex: “Today, if I were a song, I’d be _____.”</span></em></span></span></span></span></p>   <p><span><span><span><span><em><span>“I’m bringing in ____. Checked in.”</span></em></span></span></span></span></p> <br />    <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>MORE COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Use Zoom’s breakout rooms to give everyone three minutes with a partner at the beginning of class to discuss the reading, brainstorm a big question, or just check in.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>LESS COMPLEX</strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Leave an open chat on Collab/Canvas (that you moderate) as a “check-in” space. Optional: Provide a few sentence stems to support engagement.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>   <p><span><span><span><span><em><span>Ex: "I am learning how to ___________."</span></em></span></span></span></span></p>   <p><span><span><span><span><em><span>"I’m currently experiencing _________ as a challenge."</span></em></span></span></span></span></p>   <br />   <p><strong>MORE COMPLEX</strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Set up a group via a social media platform and invite students to share snapshots of their lives that pertain to the class or that they want to share with the class community</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td><strong><a id="Connect students to instructor" name="Connect students to instructor">Connect students to instructor</a></strong></td> <td> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>LESS COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you provide an opportunity for students to check in, participate in the check in yourself. Acknowledge the way current events are affecting you, to the level you are comfortable.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong>MORE COMPLEX</strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Hold office hours via Zoom and encourage students to attend. Attendance at an open office hour or checking in via email might be a great replacement for a participation grade.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>LESS COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Avoid writing to students about how this relates to another hardship you’ve experienced. Focus on providing concise, consistent, frequent communication, perhaps including one or two sentences to acknowledge that this is all new for everyone.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>   <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>MORE COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Rather than providing weekly information only in writing, create a short accompanying video. Allow students who are participating asynchronously to see your face, meet your pets, and see what you’re doing to move through this time.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> </td> </tr><tr><td> <p><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Connect students to field" name="Connect students to field">Connect students to field</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong></p>   <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>*Note: Pay attention to how the identities of guest speakers and highlighted scholars reflect the identities of students in the course.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>LESS COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Replace one of your readings with a recent article on how your specific field is navigating the coronavirus pandemic. Invite students to connect their current experiences and new ways of working to the experiences of the field as a whole.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>   <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>MORE COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>With everyone working from home, now could be a perfect time to organize guest speakers--invite colleagues or friends in the field to drop into your Zoom class or participate in a panel discussion.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>LESS COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Invite students to follow the Twitter accounts or blog of a scholar in your field. Ask them to engage in current discourse and discuss trends they are noticing in a Collab/Canvas forum.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>   <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>MORE COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <span><span><span><span><span><span>Use </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://learningtech.virginia.edu/tools/kaltura" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Kaltura</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> to create a video quiz as students watch a recent keynote or presentation from a scholar in the field</span></span></span></span></span></span></td> </tr><tr><td><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Affirm students’ values and goals" name="Affirm students’ values and goals">Affirm students’ values and goals</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong></td> <td> <p><strong>LESS COMPLEX</strong></p> <p>Before the course begins, ask students to complete a "Getting to Know You" questionnaire (this can also be a video or audio clip). Include a question as, "How do you live out your core values?" or "How might your core values connect to this course?</p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>MORE COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p>At two or three points throughout the semester, ask students to reflect on how they are living out their core values. You can make this a short, ungraded writing assignment. The question and the students' reflection doesn't need to be connected to the course content in order to be impactful. To learn more about the effectiveness of values affirmations, check out <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5589421/">this article</a>.</p> </td> <td> <p><strong>LESS COMPLEX</strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Invite students to respond to a forum question around how their personal values are lived out during this particular time and experience of the course.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p>   <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>MORE COMPLEX</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Invite students to respond to the above prompt, but with a photo, song, or video submission.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Explain expectations for assessments" name="Explain expectations for assessments">Explain expectations for assessments</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong></td> <td><span><span><span><span><span><span>Take student questions on assignments via </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.sli.do/" target="_blank">sli.do</a>, Zoom poll or Collab/Canvas survey, </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>and take time in class to answer thoroughly.</span></span></span></span></span></span></td> <td><span><span><span><span><span><span>Ask students to read the assignment rubric and submit questions on an assignment-focused forum. Go through each question to respond.</span></span></span></span></span></span></td> </tr><tr><td><strong><span><span><span><span><span><span><a id="Explain expectations for participation" name="Explain expectations for participation">Explain expectations for participation</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></strong></td> <td> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Create a “Norms for Zoom” list of expectations. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Example:</strong></p> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Please mute your audio unless actively speaking.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Please avoid using the public chat unless we are using it for class, but feel free to chat to me privately with questions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>You can use the “Take a Break,” “Slow Down,” etc. tools freely. I may not be able to respond immediately.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you need to leave the room for a moment, please mute your video so I can see that you’re no longer present. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Feel free to situate yourself in whatever way will best support your learning.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></td> <td><span><span><span><span><span><span>Create a “Norms for Asynchronous Participation” to inform students of what you expect. Create a short rubric or list of guidelines around length, citations, formality, etc., and try to provide examples when possible. Use your own responses to Discussion posts to model productive participation.</span></span></span></span></span></span></td> </tr></tbody></table><h2>Key Questions</h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Inclusive teaching practice</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> is perhaps even more critical as students are navigating virtual learning in widely varying contexts. It’s important that all students have equitable access to learning, but it’s also critical at this time to recognize the ways in which student bandwidth will be stretched in different ways depending on personal circumstances. Physical location, mental health, access to the internet, personal affect from the pandemic, abilities and disabilities that might shape virtual learning--all of these factors mean that every individual is having a different experience in your course. These are a few key ideas to keep in mind as you consider teaching online during this time of crisis:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><strong>How do I acknowledge the emotional and physical toll of the crisis?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Normalize distraction, reduced productivity, mental and emotional burdens, etc. Normalize a drive towards productivity, hyper-awareness, over-consumption of media. Normalize too much or too little sleep, loneliness and a desire for solitude, creativity and boredom. </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.chronicle.com/article/Why-You-Should-Ignore-All-That/248366/?fbclid=IwAR0ISVPZVRZHlvZn0STGMyfSWlYnQJqvueRjtGhT3yLwvCdOS3lhX8csNRg#.XoEqAN_O_a8.facebook" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This article by Dr. Aisha Ahmad</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> does an excellent job of normalizing a host of responses for faculty; try to do the same for your students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Introduce all of your assignments for the rest of the semester now, and make all deadlines suggestions, with a final deadline at the end of the semester. There will be times when your students are feeling more capable to be productive, and they can jump in and get things done. There will be other times when they are unable to finish “on time.” Making rubrics, assignment descriptions, etc. available now gives students the agency to self-direct their learning based on their individual circumstances. Providing suggestions (and clarity about how much time each assignment might take) supports them in making those decisions.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>In all of your language, de-stigmatize real conversations around mental health. Consistently point to the resources that exist for students. If you are comfortable doing so, talk about how you are supporting your own mental health.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>More useful tips on supporting students:</span></span></span></span></span></span> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www-chronicle-com.proxy01.its.virginia.edu/article/Do-No-Harm-The/248363?cid=wcontentlist_hp_latest" target="_blank">‘Do No Harm’: The Coronavirus Crisis Calls for Compassion, Say Faculty Members Sharing Advice</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><a href="https://www-chronicle-com.proxy01.its.virginia.edu/article/10-Tips-to-Support-Students-in/248380?cid=wcontentgrid_hp_1b" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>10 Tips to Support Students in a Stressful Shift to Online Learning</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> </ul></li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>How can I restructure assignments to allow for students’ differing contexts?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider offering 2-3 specific options for how students can demonstrate learning for your assignments. Perhaps you offer the option of a group assignment or an individual assignment. Perhaps reflections can be recorded via video, audio recording, or written text. Perhaps students can choose to research a topic related to the current coronavirus pandemic, or they can choose to research something that’s less intensely relevant to them at this time.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Avoid offering </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>any </span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>option, or requiring students to tell you what they want to do with no guiding principles. There are many decisions being made right now, and some students are making more decisions for themselves than others. </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200330-covid-19-how-to-learn-a-new-skill-in-coronavirus-quarantine" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Avoid contributing to decision fatigue</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> as much as possible, and give a few clear, simple options instead.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>How can I demonstrate sensitivity to students’ varying experiences of this crisis? </strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Rigorously avoid oppressive language, and interrupt any similar language that might be coming from students during your meetings. Notice if language moves towards racism, fatphobia, ableism, or classism. </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Here are a few thought pieces to support your learning</span></span></span></span></span></span> <ul><li><a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/coronavirus-personal-nightmare-people-ocd-anxiety-disorders-n1164066" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Coronavirus is a 'personal nightmare' for people with OCD and anxiety disorders</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.teenvogue.com/story/disabled-people-react-to-coronavirus-work-from-home-accommodations" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Disabled People React to Coronavirus Work From Home Accommodations</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2020/atp-how-can-i-confront-coronavirus-racism" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>How Can I Confront Coronavirus Racism?</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.npr.org/2020/03/27/822383360/asian-americans-are-blamed-by-some-for-covid-19-outbreak" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Asian Americans Are Blamed By Some For COVID-19 Outbreak</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.chronicle.com/article/For-Many-Graduate-Students/248360?cid=wcontentlist_hp_latest" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>For Many Graduate Students, Covid-19 Pandemic Highlights Inequities</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.allure.com/story/covid-19-weight-gain-jokes-eating-disorders" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Can I Socially Distance Myself From These Terrible Jokes About Gaining Weight While Quarantined?</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.facebook.com/RealAmericaWithJorgeRamos/videos/723336611743468/?v=723336611743468" target="_blank">COVID: Campus Crisis: Perspective from underresourced students on the shift to virtual learning</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>How should I co</strong><strong>mmunicate with students?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Students, like instructors, are moving through untold numbers of emails, news updates, and communication from friends and family. The more clear and concise you can make your communication, the better.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider consistency in format, language, and tone. If you are able to maintain the communication tools you utilized before spring break, do so. Otherwise, explain thoroughly how you will use Collab, email, etc., and then stay consistent in your use of these tools.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Consider </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="http://digitalaccessibility.vpit.virginia.edu/" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>digital accessibility</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> at all times, for all communication.</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>How can I shift to virtual assessment in an equitable manner?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you are requiring that students demonstrate participation in a different way for virtual, asynchronous learning, consider if their contributions </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><em><span>must</span></em></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> be in writing. Is writing their reflections a learning objective for the course? If not, consider </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://learningtech.virginia.edu/tools/flipgrid" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>video contributions</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>, audio recording, images, or offering a sentence stem for a one-sentence check-in. For students, writing a well-crafted reflection weekly for every course adds up, so consider if this is necessary for the participation and learning you are assessing.</span></span></span></span></span></span> <ul><li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Tip: think about </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.chronicle.com/interactives/20191108-Advice-Feedback" target="_blank"><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>varying your feedback</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> with one of these methods, too. Can you send students audio-recorded feedback rather than written feedback? Would that save time for you?</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>If students are going to collaborate in groups on a project, there are a number of additional logistics they’ll navigate to make their work successful. Consider adding in a “virtual logistics” aspect to your rubric, and move several points to that aspect. Credit students for the difficult labor of figuring all of those details out.</span></span></span></span></span></span> <span><span><span><span><span><span>Likewise, if you’re expecting students to record presentations online or design other means of presenting their work, consider valuing the additional work of learning a new platform in the grade you’re providing. </span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Refer to our <a href="https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/assessment">Assessment page</a> for additional strategies and techniques</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul></dd> </dl></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:curated_links" data-inline-block-uuid="acc84a56-f6d3-4875-8ad4-abe9b07c099f" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--curated-links"> <h2>Additional Resources</h2> <div class="field field--name-field-url-cl field--type-link field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://www.chronicle.com/article/8-Ways-to-Be-More-Inclusive-in/248460/" target="_blank">8 Ways to Be More Inclusive in Your Zoom Teaching</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/sites/g/files/jsddwu206/files/2020-04/Student%20Belonging%20in%20Online%20Learning%20Environment_1.pdf" target="_blank">9 Ways to Create Belonging in a Virtual Classroom</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/sites/g/files/jsddwu206/files/2020-05/Making%20Equity%20Essential.pdf" target="_blank">Making Equity Essential</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://acue.org/inclusive-teaching-practices-toolkit/" target="_blank">ACUE Inclusive Teaching Practices Toolkit</a></div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:video" data-inline-block-uuid="0748f726-4967-4254-84a1-6565a35c6b44" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--video"> <div class="field field--name-field-video field--type-video-embed-field field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wYPtxeHGZVI?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">assessment</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/481" hreflang="en"> attendance</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/466" hreflang="en">breakout rooms</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/21" hreflang="en">inclusive teaching</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/371" hreflang="en">Kaltura</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/486" hreflang="en"> mental health</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/16" hreflang="en">Zoom</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 31 Mar 2020 18:34:14 +0000 ks8yx 71 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Student Presentations https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/student-presentations <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Student Presentations</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 03/27/2020 - 12:58</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="views-element-container block block-views block-views-block--important-notice-notice-view-block" data-block-plugin-id="views_block:important_notice-notice_view_block"> <div><div class="view view-important-notice view-id-important_notice view-display-id-notice_view_block js-view-dom-id-a38ee1f70ba2c1b2d22adfb282fafbd6bea36f9060934ddb415eb10b42ec1dff"> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><h2>Why use student presentations?</h2> <p>Student presentations serve many purposes in coursework. As you think about the best way to transition presentations online, consider the primary goals for presentations in your course. For example:</p> <ul><li><em>Is it important that student presenters interact with an audience? Are there asynchronous interactions that are sensible for your context?</em></li> <li><em>How important is the product itself to the course objectives? Could students use other technologies and/or media to demonstrate the same learning?</em></li> <li><em>Is this a group or solo presentation? Is student collaboration important to the course learning objectives?</em></li> </ul><p> </p> <table><thead><tr><th style="width: 120px;">FACE-TO-FACE PLAN</th> <th style="width: 164px;">SAMPLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES</th> <th style="width: 171px;">SYNCHRONOUS POSSIBILITIES</th> <th style="width: 175px;">ASYNCHRONOUS POSSIBILITIES</th> </tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="width: 122px;"><strong>Student presentations</strong></td> <td style="width: 166px;"> <p>Orally and/or visually <em>communicate</em><em> </em>about course ideas</p>   <p><em>Synthesize and explain</em> complex ideas for a nonspecialist audience</p> <p><br /><em>Create</em><em> </em>a presentation using particular media and/or techniques</p> </td> <td style="width: 173px;"> <p>Students present in real time using Zoom, either to entire class or just to instructor. Use screen sharing function to display slides, videos, and/or other visual media. Consider having students present synchronously if interaction between presenters and audience supports key learning objectives.</p> </td> <td style="width: 177px;"> <p>Students record presentations using Zoom or other video recording software (iMovie and similar tools are powerful but have limited UVA support), and post to Collab/Canvas under Media Gallery. Asynchronous presentations are likely to be more accessible to other students.</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><h2>Using this practice, how do I...</h2> <dl class="ckeditor-accordion"><dt><strong>create equitable and inclusive learning experiences for my students, particularly in difficult and uncertain times?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li>Provide more than one option for how students can complete the assignment, recognizing that students will have vastly different working environments and access to technology.</li> <li>Students are adapting to many changes and stressors right now. Consider how much of a learning curve changes to presentations will require and look for ways to minimize new things students will need to learn. If they are anxious about how to use the technology, this is likely to detract from the effort they’re able to put into the aspects of the presentation related to key learning objectives.</li> <li>If using synchronous presentations, consider if and how you allow students to interact with the presenter. Provide expectations for and model respect and reciprocity in the interactions.</li> <li>Protect yourself and your students from “<a href="https://virginia.service-now.com/its?id=itsweb_kb_article&amp;sys_id=6ea05542db301784f032f1f51d96192c#settings" target="_blank">Zoombombing</a>."</li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>acknowledge students as whole people and design for their social, emotional, and intellectual development?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li>Recognize that students will have a range of prior knowledge and experience with the presenting medium.</li> <li>If students will now need to use technology in ways that were not part of the original assignment, clarify whether the new format(s) will affect the assessment. For instance, if students were originally to present live and now must make a video of themselves presenting, will the quality of the video also be assessed? If so, be sure to support their learning how to use the technology.</li> <li>If students appearing in their presentations is not critical to your learning objectives, tend to students’ possible anxieties about showing their faces by allowing multiple styles of presentation, such as screen casts and animations and podcasts. These types of presentations may also be more effective in the new medium than a video of someone speaking.</li> <li>Tend to student motivations. Especially if the assignment is not obviously a creative production, indicate which parts of the assignment should reflect the students’ interests, attitudes, and unique positionality.</li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>allow students to make connections and organize their knowledge in meaningful ways, recognizing their prior learning and addressing any inaccuracies?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li>Decide how students will source content for their presentations. Include scaffolding assignments to help students organize their thoughts and develop arguments or create drafts of creative work.</li> <li>Student presentations allow students to demonstrate how they organize and apply information and principles. The creative process allows synthesis of discrete concepts, theories, and arguments.</li> </ul></dd> <dt><strong>enable students to acquire and practice skills and receive feedback?</strong></dt> <dd> <ul><li>Create clear assignment instructions and evaluation criteria that enable students to balance their efforts between the quality of the presentation and the mastery of the content. Make sure evaluation criteria reflect the type of learning that is most important for your course. Consider using a rubric to evaluate and make sure rubric reflects the new circumstances as appropriate.</li> <li>Producing outlines, practicing the presentation/performance in front of peers, and other scaffolding steps can be incentivized in the assignment description and/or rubric. Consider what new skills students will need to learn and practice in order to present successfully in a virtual environment.</li> <li>As much as possible, give students low-stakes, formative feedback on their scaffolded work and practice, in order to ensure the final presentation is as successful as possible. For example, use Zoom breakout rooms for students to practice presentations in front of small groups before giving a final presentation.</li> </ul></dd> </dl></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/361" hreflang="en">Collab</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/396" hreflang="en">PowerPoint</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/446" hreflang="en"> screen share</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1" hreflang="en">assessment</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/6" hreflang="en">student presentations</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/16" hreflang="en">Zoom</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 27 Mar 2020 16:58:13 +0000 ks8yx 66 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu Community-Engaged Courses https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu/community-engaged-courses <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Community-Engaged Courses</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/31" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ks8yx</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 03/27/2020 - 11:46</span> <div class="layout layout--twocol-70-30"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first layout__region--70 region-small"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field__label visually-hidden">Body</div> <div class="field__item"><p><span><span><span>For the 2020-2021 academic year, faculty and students doing community-engaged work face particular challenges. The </span><span>pandemic is amplifying and exacerbating more inequities by the day, and the University of Virginia as an anchor institution bears responsibility for ethical engagement during the continued crisis. And as thousands of students return to Charlottesville, the public health imperative to physically distance from residents of Charlottesville and the surrounding counties seems to undermine the goals of community-engaged teaching.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>For classes in which community engagement, public service, and volunteering comprise a key portion of the learning objectives and course assignments, these goals present particular challenges. In many cases, learning goals must change this year and remain flexible.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>As you continue to plan your classes, please remember the stress that a public health crisis places on community organizations. In the coming months, it will be essential to place the needs of community organizations before the pedagogical needs of our students.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>In any engagement with the community, the underlying question should always be: How</span><span> can the University of Virginia be a good neighbor and a good partner?</span></span></span></p> <h2>Community Partners</h2> <p><span><span><span>With very few exceptions, community engagement should be carried out virtually this semester. </span><span>It may be appropriate for faculty to find out if the organizations they have worked with in the past have needs that can be accomplished virtually. Community-engaged language classes, for example, helped translate documents during the Spring 2020 semester. Please do not have students reach out individually to organizations in search of volunteer opportunities. Please also remind students that most, if not all, of your community partners are continuously grappling with the challenges dealt by the COVID-19 pandemic to their organization and the communities it serves. They may be unable to respond to inquiries about virtual volunteering or to maintain long-term virtual volunteering partnerships. </span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span>Madison House</span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span>On March 12, 2020, Madison House suspended all volunteer activities for the remainder of the Spring 2020 semester. For Fall 2020, Madison House continues to evaluate its volunteer programs on a case-by-case basis. Faculty who had planned to work with Madison House during the Fall 2020 semester to secure volunteer placements for their students should contact Madison House individually to learn more about the status of their plans.</span></span></span></p> <h2>Suggestions for Fall 2020</h2> <p><span><span><span>Shift the focus of the class to critical reflection and incorporate assignments that encourage learning about the social issues impacting the groups you work with. You may want to ask students to spend some time investigating how something like a pandemic could, or currently is, affecting the people and communities they would have been working with. Similarly, you may research how some of the domino effects of the pandemic—from social distancing, to racial profiling and K-12 educational disruptions—impact the community now and in the future.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Be sure that conversations about the impact of COVID-19 on communities also include coverage of the constructive ways in which the community is responding. Students can explore the grassroots mutual aid networks that have emerged around the nation, as well as how community organizations are bridging gaps in service, outreach, and communications created by social distancing directives.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>While considering the impact of the pandemic on the community, it is essential that students also consider how their own role and responsibilities in the community of UVA, Charlottesville, and beyond have shifted or expanded.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Your students may also contemplate and discuss how the University’s collective role and responsibilities (including its role as an anchor institution) has changed, or should change in order to be a better neighbor. Consider initiatives and calls-to-action, like the ones below, as starting points:</span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><a href="https://virginiaequitycenter.org/frontline-workers-charter">The Equity Center’s Frontline Workers Charter</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="http://voicesforequity.virginiaequitycenter.org/">A History of Racial Equity Activism at UVA</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://www.cvillechamber.com/rebound/">Project Rebound</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://strategicplan.virginia.edu/strategic-goals/">UVA 2030 Strategic Plan</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://news.virginia.edu/content/uva-announces-affordable-housing-goal">UVA Affordable Housing Goal</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://virginiaequitycenter.org/be-good-neighbor">“To Be a Good Neighbor,” Report from The Equity Center</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://communityworkinggroup.virginia.edu/">UVA Community Working Group Report</a></span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://racialequity.virginia.edu/sites/g/files/jsddwu356/files/2020-08/RETFFinalSigned.pdf">Racial Equity Task Force Final Report</a></span></span></li> </ul><p><span><span><span>Ideally, community engagement courses are co-designed with community partners. This would be a good time to practice that method with the students themselves. You might take the first class meeting to co-create expectations that account for displacement, distance, and revised course objectives. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Use COVID to re-examine “community.” What does community mean when the act of creating and maintaining community has been upended? Where else does community exist? Does it go online?</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Foreground the work that you and your students must do to create community in the virtual classroom. This may mean asking students to help you come up with classroom community-building exercises that invite students to freely converse with one another, share personal reflections, and get to know one another. Consider having conversations with your students about what they feel is the academic or interpersonal importance, if any, of building community among their classmates. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Working from the idea of a classroom as a community, you may explore whether students can provide support, or at the very least a sounding board, to their classmates as they each adjust to a semester of virtual attendance and suspended activities. </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Expand the concept of classroom community to include college students around the country. You may do so by using resources developed on other campuses (see list below), or by creating a local “COVID-19 Syllabus” of your own in the style of the </span><a href="https://medium.com/@UVAGSC/the-charlottesville-syllabus-9e01573419d0"><span>Charlottesville Syllabus</span></a><span> or </span><a href="https://www.aaihs.org/resources/charlestonsyllabus/"><span>Charleston Syllabus</span></a><span>.</span></span></span></p> <ul><li><span><span><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UeAN5jhSib-CsP17keNC6c3iMF7PgE3KDDDBy24w0xY/edit">Northeastern University Humanities Coronavirus Syllabus</a> - This syllabus has a separate section dedicated to other relevant syllabi </span></span></li> <li><span><span><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-6d_W8rdzE9mW2DvPi-dPvRxo4sekKlz3VqEpnu4Dwg/preview">The “Adjusted Syllabus” of Brandon Bayne, UNC-Chapel Hill</a> </span></span></li> </ul></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="layout__region layout__region--second layout__region--30 region-small"> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:text" data-inline-block-uuid="71c095f8-f2d9-42b5-8fa6-d8c6a2b0d8eb" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--text"> <h2>Contact</h2> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><em><span>These guidelines were assembled by Bonnie Gordon and Rose Cole, with help from Ellen Blackmon, over the week of March 16, 2020. Some links were added and updated on March 26</span><span>, and the latest update was completed on August 18</span><span>. Faculty and staff are invited to reach out to Bonnie, Rose, or Ellen with questions and comments.</span></em></span></p> <ul><li>Bonnie Gordon<br /><a href="mailto:Bsg6v@virginia.edu" target="_blank">Bsg6v@virginia.edu</a><br /><em>Associate Professor, Department of Music<br /> Faculty Director, Equity Center</em></li> <li>Rose Cole<br /><a href="mailto:Rose@madisonhouse.org" target="_blank">Rose@madisonhouse.org</a><br /><em>Director of Community Engagement, Madison House</em></li> <li>Ellen Blackmon<br /><a href="mailto:Edb2q@virginia.edu" target="_blank">Edb2q@virginia.edu</a><br /><em>Curricular Coordinator for Community Engagement, Office for Academic Outreach</em></li> </ul></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:curated_links" data-inline-block-uuid="fe8934b1-c08b-4d60-8b83-ddbc6eb5a3dc" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--curated-links"> <h2>Local COVID-19 Resources</h2> <div class="field field--name-field-url-cl field--type-link field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://cultivatecharlottesville.org/covid-19/" target="_blank">Community Calendar of Food Access Resources</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://cvilleloaves.org/index.php/get-groceries/how-to-get-free-groceries" target="_blank">Loaves &amp; Fishes Food Pantry</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://www.brafb.org/find-help/pantry-locator/" target="_blank">Blue Ridge Area Food Pantry (multiple locations)</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://airtable.com/shrc0tEYhvVKjR1bS" target="_blank">Cville Community Cares Prescription Assistance Form</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uGRXP3ScBnSbOTCz6xsVRHfhRmrIhfT88mIWr87COnM/edit" target="_blank">Virginia Community Response Network: Assistance for COVID-19 Emotional Trauma</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://helphappenshere.org/" target="_blank">Community Mental Health and Wellness Coalition: Free and affordable short-term …</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/thomas-jefferson/covid-19-testing-sites/" target="_blank">Free COVID-19 Testing in the Thomas Jefferson Health District</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://dmz1.dhcd.virginia.gov/RMRPEligibility/" target="_blank">Virginia Rent and Mortgage Relief Program</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://unitedwaycville.org/receive-support/covid-19-support/" target="_self">Emergency Assistance for Households in Charlottesville, Albemarle, Buckingham, …</a></div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="inline_block:text" data-inline-block-uuid="6be8265b-dac1-4cd5-b092-996d4412db7e" class="block block-layout-builder block-inline-block--text"> <h2>Community-Engaged Teaching in a Time of Trauma</h2> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Check out the <a href="/community-engaged-teaching-time-trauma">CTE video series</a> that documents the unique experiences of UVA faculty who taught community-engaged courses in Spring 2020.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content region-full"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_cate" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-cate"> <div class="field field--name-field-page-cate field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Categories</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Pedagogy</a></div> </div> </div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:basic_page:field_page_" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-block--node--basic-page--field-page-"> <div class="field field--name-field-page- field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Page Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/11" hreflang="en">community engagement</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/346" hreflang="en"> students</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 27 Mar 2020 15:46:35 +0000 ks8yx 61 at https://teachingcontinuity.virginia.edu